Apr 28 2009

Crayola Factory in Easton, Pennsylvania

One place we went out of our way to see was the Crayola Factory in Easton, Pennsylvania.  It promised creativity and learning how crayons and markers are made, and we thought it would be a lot of fun.

We were wrong.

The “factory” isn’t really a factory, and I knew that going in.  They have a room with a seating area where you can watch a staff member make a few crayons and markers behind a glass wall, if the equipment is working properly.  In that regard, you do get to see the process for making crayons and markers, but you don’t get anywhere near the actual factory.

Crayola deomonstration

The creativity center was most disappointing for us.  It was loud and brightly colored in addition to being crowded, making it headache-city to keep track of the kids.  While it’s true that there were a lot of Crayola products available for the kids to use, I didn’t see it as inspiring creativity.

Crayons at Crayola

A precut shape at a table with markers or crayons screams “preschool” to me, not “creativity,” especially when you’re not supposed to take the equipment from one area to another.  Thus, the kids could go to one table and play with clay, another for crayons, another for markers, etc.

Crayola activity area

The one area our kids like the best was a studio where they could make a picture using melted crayon wax.  This was actually something unique that they don’t get to do at home, but there was an age limit, so the little ones cried that they couldn’t try it.

There was one display about the history of the company, and I was surprised there wasn’t more of a museum feel to the place.

Crayola history display

With the price of admission ($9.50 each), each person gets four tokens, which can be redeemed for a small pack of crayons, a single marker, or some clay.  Admission also includes the National Canal Museum upstairs.

Crayola crayons

After we visited (too little, too late, I suppose), I read reviews to see if we were alone in our disappointment.  It seems that people either love or hate the Crayola factory.  My advice:  if you let your kids play with crayons and markers and glue and clay and paper at home and even perhaps (gasp!) allow them to mix the media, you’ll be disappointed in the Crayola Factory.

I would have preferred to have gone to the Crayola store next door and spent our admission money on a ton of new art supplies.

Crayola Store

The store is amazing in its range of Crayola products, and is also the home of “Big Blue,” the biggest crayon ever made.

Big Blue at Crayola Store

If you’re in Easton, the Crayola store is the place I recommend.  The Crayola Factory? Unless you never let your kids draw or paint at home, skip it.

Note:  Admission to the National Canal Museum is included with the Crayola Factory fee.  If you do opt to go to Crayola, don’t miss the Canal Museum.  It was the favored spot of the campus for us.

 

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12 comments so far

12 Comments to “Crayola Factory in Easton, Pennsylvania”

  1. Meg on 28 Apr 2009 at 6:10 pm

    Thanks for this great review. We almost stopped by this Sunday on the way back from Grandmom’s house, but we went for Mexican food instead. Good to know it is not worth the hour detour and admission.

    Meg’s last blog post..Travel in a Time of Epidemic

  2. Sandra Foyt on 28 Apr 2009 at 7:53 pm

    Like you, I was less than thrilled by the Crayola Factory, especially as I took a group of 12yo Girl Scouts. The weird thing is that they’re begging to go back! (I’m pretty sure they have crayons at home…)

    Sandra Foyt’s last blog post..Earth Day Brings Sunny Days and Clear Waters

  3. [...] our time at the Crayola Factory was disappointing, there was a bright spot in our admission price:  the National Canal Museum.  [...]

  4. Barbara on 29 Apr 2009 at 7:01 am

    Sucks you were disappointed. The pictures of the big crayons are pretty sweet though.

  5. Claire Walter on 29 Apr 2009 at 7:54 am

    Too bad that you didn’t find it worth the price of admission, but Sandra Foyt’s comment that the 12-year-olds are “begging to go back” tells me that kids love it. When my now-grown son was young, I took him to all the requisite kids’ movies and kids’ attractions and hated most of them. It was still the era when museums were less sprightly and interactive than they are now. I thought he out to appreciate the subtleties of the displays. He was bored. When I look at the images on the post, I see a bright, engaging space that is designed for youngsters, not for the adults who take them there.

  6. [...] How to respond to a negative blog review Filed under: Blogs, Web Communications — Sheila Scarborough @ 3:22 pm Tags: blogging, Blogs, Crayola Factory, Easton Pennsylvania, how to respond, marketing, negative review, PR, public relations, social media, tips This morning I Stumbled a post on the Travels with Children blog; it’s a fairly negative review of the Crayola Factory in Easton, Pennsylvania. [...]

  7. Anne on 29 Apr 2009 at 9:08 am

    We love chopping up crayons and putting them in cupcake tins and baking to make multi colored crayons….I think we’ll stick with this and hit the store if we get the chance!

    Thanks for the review!

    Anne’s last blog post..Village Spotlight: West Tisbury

  8. Sharlene on 29 Apr 2009 at 5:05 pm

    Bummer. I thought the crayola factory would be much cooler than that.

  9. [...] Crayola Factory in Easton, Pennsylvania Posted on Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 in Tours – Comments: (8) One place we went out of our way to see was the Crayola Factory in Easton, Pennsylvania.  It promised creativity and learning how crayons and markers are made, and we thought it would be a lot of fun.We were wrong.The “factory” isn’t really a factory, and I knew that going in.  They have a room with a seating area where you can watch a staff member make a few crayons and markers behind a glass wall, if the equipment is working properly. [...]

  10. minnemom on 01 May 2009 at 8:22 am

    Claire, after reading your comment, I checked with my 6-year-old to see what he said about the Crayola Factory.

    “Did you like the Crayola Factory?”

    “Yeah.” (Uh-oh, I’m thinking, I did get this all wrong from the kids’ perspective.) “I really liked the waterworks upstairs.”

    The waterworks were part of the National Canal Museum, not the actual Crayola Factory.

    When I asked the other kids, my older son said he liked writing on the glass walls with the window markers (I had forgotten that section), and my 4-year-old daughter remembered that she cried because she wasn’t old enough to do the melted-wax area.

    Those were the kids’ recollections.

  11. Janine (@twincident) on 01 May 2009 at 11:56 am

    I am so glad I read this as we are making our way near there this summer. Now I now to save the $40! OR – just spend it at the store!

    Janine (@twincident)’s last blog post..WE CAN! Help our kids avoid childhood obesity with Subway and Scholastic (Part 2)

  12. Donna on 03 Jul 2009 at 12:38 pm

    This was the biggest rip-off. Only the kids kindergarden age and younger seem engaged and there was little of merit. We were told before entering that this was good for adults and older children… so much for honesty. And they time stamp incorrectly (one hour earlier) and then say you’ve spent over one hour at the place. Avoid this awful place at all costs. Buy the crayons and markers instead.

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